Daily Meditations

People like me are fortunate that ours is not a religious program; rather, it is a spiritual program.

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 111)

God puts skin on and comes to us in the form of other OA members.

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 16)

If I want to know whether I’m doing God’s will, all I have to do is observe what I’m eating. No matter what my head tells me about what I am or am not doing, if my food is clean, I’m on the right track!

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 28)

My concept of God as ‘man’ was limiting, but a briliant, white, loving light could be anywhere and do anything.

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 42)

If I want a relationship with God, I must do exactly what I do when I want relationships with people: I have to spend time with him, talk to him, listen to him.

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 5)

If the disease of compulsive overeating brings us together, our recovery keeps us together.

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 64)

In Step One, we learn the principle of honesty as we admit our personal powerlessness over food…that without help we cannot successfully manage our own lives.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 103)

In Step Two, we learn hope as we come to believe that a power greater than ourselves can restore us to sanity.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 104)

In Step Three, we learn faith as we make the most important decision we have ever made: to trust God–as we understand God–with our will and our lives.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 104)

In Steps Four and Five, we learn courage and integrity as we face the truth about our defects of character.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 104)