Daily Meditations

Family members thought it odd that my eating habits had changed. Some even signified about me being ‘too good’ to eat the food they had spent all day cooking. My only support came from our program and my Higher Power.

Black OA Members Share Their Experience, Strength and Hope (p. 7)

My sponsor said, ‘Act as if you believe, and some day the desire will become reality.’ Because I trusted my sponsor and wanted the kind of recovery I saw in her, I acted as if I had a loving God in my life. Eventually, in conjunction with my own spiritual awakening, the desire became reality.

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 20)

You don’t have to be perfect–just willing.

A Guide for Sponsors (p. 14)

The program is not meant to be worked alone, and many OA members attribute their progress to the fact that someone took a special interest in them.

A Guide for Sponsors (p. 2)

Each meal began with the Third-Step prayer. I became abstinent with God’s help.

A New Beginning (p. 101)

I may indeed be very busy, but I won’t have a life if I don’t put my program first.

A New Beginning (p. 14)

We’re not unlovable because we have this disease; love is the very thing we need in order to recover.

A New Beginning (p. 35)

Someone told me that we are babies in OA for five years. That’s a comfort and a reminder that growth will continue as long as I’m working the Steps.

A New Beginning (p. 51)

Don’t forget that when the heart is heavy and resistance is low, and the mind is troubled and confused, there is much comfort in a true and understanding friend standing by. You have that friend in Overeaters Anonymous.

Before You Take That First Compulsive Bite, Remember…

Today, I’d rather have a bad day in Overeaters Anonymous than a good day while overeating.

Black OA Members Share Their Experience, Strength and Hope (p. 3)

Skin color, family structures and relationships, ages, occupations and manifestations of the disease are different, but we are all powerless over food.

Black OA Members Share Their Experience, Strength and Hope (p. 4)

I am usually the only person of color at the meetings I attend. I feel okay about that and feel accepted as just another person with a food addiction, struggling to be free.

Black OA Members Share Their Experience, Strength and Hope (p. 4)

Whether I have been abstinent 12 hours or 12 years, I never have it made. Today’s recovery is all I have.

For Today (p. 135)

For an honest, balanced view of myself, I take a few moments in which I free my mind of everything except God’s love for me.

For Today (p. 153)

God grant me the wisdom to understand my longings and the willingness to act in my own best interest.

For Today (p. 187)

When I am busy cultivating loving relationships, I can easily do without a surprising number of things.

For Today (p. 208)

The OA program, the people and God are all there for me, loving me fat or thin, abstinent or compulsively overeating. Can I do any less for myself?

For Today (p. 226)

Nothing that happened yesterday or that may happen tomorrow is more important than NOW.

For Today (p. 248)

Staying in the real world is far less painful than hiding in food and fat.

For Today (p. 26)

I don’t need to concern myself with other people’s faults; I have all the detective work I can handle to ferret out my own.

For Today (p. 300)

The common cold takes about ten days to run its course, and nothing I can do can alter that fact. With variations in time, this is true of most of my troubles.

For Today (p. 324)

Prayer can be only ‘Thank you’ — which is as appropriate in my need and distress as it is in my abundance and joy.

For Today (p. 328)

A loving heart makes its own prayer, and prayer makes for a loving heart.

For Today (p. 62)

I guard my abstinence and my program as though they were my dearest possessions–and they are.

For Today (p. 66)

I am a continuing miracle with whom God and OA are not yet finished.

Lifeline Sampler (p. 205)

I am thankful that I learned that abstinence–not adherence to a particular way of eating–is the goal.

Lifeline Sampler (p. 304)

I cannot be fat and serene, and I don’t want to be. Thin by itself is not necessarily well, but OA is teaching me how to be both thin and serene.

Lifeline Sampler (p. 339)

Our promise of recovery is in every OA meeting when we join hands, pray together and joyously, lovingly encourage one another:Keep coming back!

Overeaters Anonymous, 2nd edition (p. 17)

I ate compulsively for years over the fear and guilt I inherited from the traditional religion of my childhood. Today, God the quiet, the nurturing, the lover of peace–the one who calls me ’sweetheart’–is always at my side.

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 10)

No longer alone, no longer lost, I have truly been blessed with a power to love and guide me, Twelve Steps to lead me, and friends who will remind me this too shall pass.

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 105)

People like me are fortunate that ours is not a religious program; rather, it is a spiritual program.

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 111)

God puts skin on and comes to us in the form of other OA members.

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 16)

If I want to know whether I’m doing God’s will, all I have to do is observe what I’m eating. No matter what my head tells me about what I am or am not doing, if my food is clean, I’m on the right track!

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 28)

My concept of God as ‘man’ was limiting, but a briliant, white, loving light could be anywhere and do anything.

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 42)

If I want a relationship with God, I must do exactly what I do when I want relationships with people: I have to spend time with him, talk to him, listen to him.

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 5)

If the disease of compulsive overeating brings us together, our recovery keeps us together.

Seeking the Spiritual Path (p. 64)

In Step One, we learn the principle of honesty as we admit our personal powerlessness over food…that without help we cannot successfully manage our own lives.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 103)

In Step Two, we learn hope as we come to believe that a power greater than ourselves can restore us to sanity.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 104)

In Step Three, we learn faith as we make the most important decision we have ever made: to trust God–as we understand God–with our will and our lives.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 104)

In Steps Four and Five, we learn courage and integrity as we face the truth about our defects of character.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 104)

In Step Six, we learn more about the necessity of willingness as we become entirely ready to let go of our shortcomings.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 104)

In Step Seven, we begin to understand the meaning of humility.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 105)

In Steps Eight and Nine, we look at the damage we have done others and set about repairing it. Now we apply the same principles of self-discipline and love for others to all of our actions.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 105)

In Step Ten, we discover the value of perseverence in working the Twelve Steps.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 105)

In Step Eleven, we learn the principle of spiritual awareness as we turn our attention to the practices of prayer and meditation.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 105)

Those of us who live this program don’t simply carry the message; we are the message.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 106)

The principle of service which underlies OA’s Twelfth Step can now guide our actions both inside and outside the program.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 106)

I can’t; God can; I think I’ll let God.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 19)

Any action, no matter how small, will help us to overcome deadly procrastination.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 31)

Far from being a negative factor, the admission of our powerlessness over food opens the door to an amazing newfound power.

The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Overeaters Anonymous (p. 5)